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11th Grade Student Proficiency Levels: Standard 3 Critical Writing

Page history last edited by Jason Stephenson 2 years, 2 months ago

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11th Grade Introduction

11th Grade Proficiency Levels

 

Standard 3: Critical Reading and Writing

Students will apply critical thinking skills to reading and writing.

 

WRITING: Students will write for varied purposes and audiences in all modes, using fully developed ideas, strong organization, well-chosen words, fluent sentences, and appropriate voice.

 

 

 

Understanding 

Objectives 

 

Approaching 

11.3.W.1

Students write narratives embedded in other modes as appropriate.

 

 
 

11.3.W.1 NARRATIVE

Students will write narratives embedded in other modes as appropriate.

 

 

 

    

Developing 

11.3.W.1

Students write narratives embedded in other modes with guidance.

 

11.3.W.1

Students write narratives as appropriate with guidance and support.

 

11.3.W.2

Students compose essays and reports to introduce topics, incorporating evidence (e.g., specific facts, examples, details, data) and following and organized structure and formal style with guidance and support.

 

11.3.W.2

Students compose essays and reports to introduce topics, incorporating evidence (e.g., specific facts, examples, details, data) and attempting an organized structure and a formal style.

 

11.3.W.2

Students compose essays and reports to objectively introduce and develop topics, incorporating evidence (e.g., specific facts, examples, details, data) and maintaining an organized structure and a formal style.

11.3.W.2 INFORMATIVE Students will compose essays and reports to objectively introduce and develop topics, incorporating evidence (e.g., specific facts, examples, details, data) and maintaining an organized structure and a formal style.

 

11.3.W.3

Students begin developing ideas by using logical reasoning and illustrative examples to connect evidences to claim(s) with guidance and support.

 

11.3.W.3

Students begin developing ideas by using logical reasoning and illustrative examples to connect evidences to claim(s).

 

11.3.W.3

Students elaborate on ideas by using logical reasoning and illustrative examples to connect evidences to claim(s).

11.3.W.3

Students will elaborate on ideas by using logical reasoning and illustrative examples to connect evidences to claim(s).

 

11.3.W.4

Students attempt to (1) introduce precise, informed claims, (2) distinguish them from alternate or opposing claims, (3) organize claims, counterclaims, and evidence in a way that provides a logical sequence for the entire argument, and (4) provide the most relevant evidences to develop balanced arguments, using credible sources with guidance and support.

 

11.3.W.4

Students attempt to (1) introduce precise, informed claims, (2) distinguish them from alternate or opposing claims, (3) organize claims, counterclaims, and evidence in a way that provides a logical sequence for the entire argument, and (4) provide the most relevant evidences to develop balanced arguments, using credible sources.

11.3.W.4

Students (1) introduce precise, informed claims, (2) distinguish them from alternate or opposing claims, (3) organize claims, counterclaims, and evidence in a way that provides a logical sequence for the entire argument, and (4) provide the most relevant evidences to develop balanced arguments, using credible sources.

11.3.W.4 ARGUMENT

Students will (1) introduce precise, informed claims, (2) distinguish them from alternate or opposing claims, (3) organize claims, counterclaims, and evidence in a way that provides a logical sequence for the entire argument, and (4) provide the most relevant evidences to develop balanced arguments, using credible sources.

 

11.3.W.5

Students use lists of transitional words, phrases, clauses, and examples of varied syntax to attempt to connect all parts of the argument and create cohesion and include a conclusion that follows logically from the information presented and supports the argument with guidance and support.

 

11.3.W.5

Students use lists of transitional words, phrases, clauses, and examples of varied syntax to attempt to connect all parts of the argument and create cohesion and include a conclusion that follows logically from the information presented and supports the argument.

11.3.W.5

Students use words, phrases, clauses, and varied syntax to connect all parts of the argument and create cohesion and include a conclusion that follows logically from the information presented and supports the argument.

 

11.3.W.5

Students will use words, phrases, clauses, and varied syntax to connect all parts of the argument and create cohesion and include a conclusion that follows logically from the information presented and supports the argument.

 

 

11.3.W.6

Students blend multiple modes of writing to produce effective argumentative essays with guidance and support.

 

11.3.W.6

Students begin to blend multiple modes of writing to produce effective argumentative essays. 

11.3.W.6

Students independently blend multiple modes of writing to produce effective argumentative essays.

 

11.3.W.6

Students will blend multiple modes of writing to produce effective argumentative essays.

 

   *Once the student demonstrates an understanding of an objective, consider a deeper acquisition of those skills. 

 

 Instructional Guidance 

Developing 
  • Display examples of essays. Have students determine components of effective writing such as a claim, with counterclaims, evidence, reasons or a message with supporting details and how different evidence and writing modes can be incorporated in one text.

  • Provide students a choice in writing topics within the three modes: Narrative, Informative, and Argument. (Pictures, photographs, music, and art can provide possible writing prompts.)

  • Provide students with a graphic organizer for organizing and developing their writing. Practice filling one out together as a class on an agreed-upon topic. Then have students fill out their graphic organizer. Graphic Organizer Options (1), Graphic Organizer Options (2).

  • Provide students with a CER graphic organizer to develop their claims, reasons, and evidence.

  • Confer with students about their writing goals and progress. Guide them toward the specific purpose for the writing mode.
  • Write in response to a prompt and share your own writing with students.
  • Provide students with a checklist to see if their own writing or a classmate’s meets expectations. Limit the focus to a few essential writing components specific to the mode. For example, in Narrative writing, dialogue, plot, setting, conflict, etc. should be evident. In Informative writing, facts, details, data, etc. should be evident. In Argument writing, claims should be supported.
  • Instruct students to brainstorm all perspectives within a topic, so they can establish different claims.
  • Instruct students to use sentence frames to practice developing ideas and connecting claims to reasoning and evidence.
Approaching 
  • Display examples of essays. Have students determine components of effective writing such as a claim, with counterclaims, evidence, reasons or a message with supporting details and how different evidence and writing modes can be incorporated in one text.

  • Provide students a choice in writing topics within the three modes: Narrative, Informative, and Argument. (Pictures, photographs, music, and art can provide possible writing prompts.)

  • Provide students with a graphic organizer for organizing and developing their writing. Graphic Organizer Options (1), Graphic Organizer Options (2).

  • Provide students with a CER graphic organizer to develop their claims, reasons, and evidence.

  • Confer with students about their writing goals and progress.

  • Provide students with a checklist to see if their own writing or a classmate’s meets expectations.

  • Instruct students to brainstorm all perspectives within a topic, so they can establish different claims.

  • Instruct students to use sentence frames to develop ideas and connect claims to reasoning and evidence.

Understanding 
  • Use mentor texts for students to study and imitate some of the good writing moves. These can be writing from past and current students, real world writers, and you the teacher.

  • Provide students a choice in writing topics within the three modes: Narrative, Informative, and Argument. (Pictures, photographs, music, and art can provide possible writing prompts.)

  • Provide students with a graphic organizer for organizing and developing their writing. Graphic Organizer Options (1), Graphic Organizer Options (2).

  • Provide students with a CER graphic organizer to develop their claims, reasons, and evidence.

  • Confer with students about their writing goals and progress.

  • Instruct students to provide feedback to one another about their writing, so they can make necessary revisions.

  • Require students to highlight and/or note the revisions that occurred between an early draft and a final draft.

  • Require students to highlight and/or note the components that make their writing effective such as a claim with counterclaims, evidence, reasons or a message with supporting details and/or the different types of evidence and writing modes they incorporated.

Deeper

Acquisition 

  • Use mentor texts for students to study and imitate their writing moves and style.

  • Provide students a choice in writing topics.

  • Instruct students to provide feedback to one another about their writing.

  • Students can submit a reflection that explains their writing decisions for the final piece submitted.

  • Allow students to pick the mode or format best suited to the purpose of the writing piece.

 

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11th Grade Introduction

11th Grade Proficiency Levels

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