| 
  • If you are citizen of an European Union member nation, you may not use this service unless you are at least 16 years old.

  • Finally, you can manage your Google Docs, uploads, and email attachments (plus Dropbox and Slack files) in one convenient place. Claim a free account, and in less than 2 minutes, Dokkio (from the makers of PBworks) can automatically organize your content for you.

View
 

4th Grade Student Proficiency Levels: Standard 2 Reading Process (redirected from 4th Grade Student Proficiency Levels: Standard 2 Rgd Proc)

Page history last edited by Danielle Calvin 2 years, 4 months ago

Back to Homepage

Back to 4th Grade Introduction

4th Grade Proficiency Levels

Standard 2: Reading and Writing Process

Students will use a variety of recursive reading and writing processes.

 

READING: Students will read and comprehend increasingly complex literary and informational texts.

 

 

 

Understanding 

Objectives 

 

Approaching 

4.2.R.1

Students can find the main idea and can differentiate between relevant and irrelevant supporting details.

 


 

 

4.2.R.1

Students will distinguish how key details support the main idea of a passage.

   

Developing 

4.2.R.1

Students can identify textual details that support main idea.

 

 

4.2.R.1

Students can identify the main idea and look for details that support the main idea with guidance. 

4.2.R.2

Students can list details that distinguish genre.

 

 

 

 

4.2.R.2

Students can identify the genre of a single text using defining characteristics.

 

 

 

4.2.R.2

Students can compare and contrast textual characteristics to distinguish genres*.

 

 

 

4.2.R.2

Students will compare and contrast details in literary and nonfiction/informational texts to discriminate various genres.

 

*See Genre Guidance on page 90 of  OAS for ELA

 

4.2.R.3

Students can identify major events and conflict in a text and begin to sequence a summary with guidance. 

 

 

4.2.R.3

Students can identify major events and conflict in a text and begin to sequence a summary and identify climax.

 

4.2.R.3

Students can use the major events along with conflict and climax to summarize a text.

 

4.2.R.3

Students will summarize events or plots (i.e., beginning, middle, end, conflict, and climax) of a story or text.

 

4.2.R.4

Students can identify main ideas and some details to begin paraphrasing with guidance.

4.2.R.4

Students can identify main ideas and some relevant details to begin to paraphrase with guidance.

4.2.R.4

Students can retell the main idea(s) and relevant supporting details using their own words to paraphrase a text.

4.2.R.4

Students will begin to paraphrase main ideas with supporting details in a text.

 
    *Once the student demonstrates an understanding of an objective, consider a deeper acquisition of those skills. 

 

 

 Instructional Guidance 

Developing 
  • Reading simple texts, ask students to identify the main idea and supporting details.  Provide guided practice identifying the main idea and locating for supporting details.  Short texts may be used for practice.  Highlighters or Post-It tags may be used to mark supporting details.

  • Display genre posters.  Furnish library with different genres.  Review genres and use genre studies to focus on new or troubling genres.  Provide practice identifying genres by characteristics.

  • After reading a text, ask students to identify and write important events on paper strips, then sequence events.  Add transition words to the beginning of the sentences and use to create a summary.  Provide guided opportunities for students to practice summarizing by sequencing events.

  • Graphic organizers, such as story maps, support summarizing.

  • For more summarizing activities, go to Reading Rockets - Summarizing.

  • After reading a short text or paragraph, ask students to identify the main idea and supporting details then record answers in a graphic organizer.  Explain paraphrasing is “using your own words”.  Use think-aloud to model putting the main idea and supporting details in your own words (paraphrasing).  Provide guided practice paraphrasing main ideas and supporting details. 
Approaching 
  • Reading simple texts, ask students to identify the main idea and relevant supporting details.  Use think alouds to model how relevant details support the text to create greater understanding.  Provide guided practice identifying how relevant details support the text.

  • For additional ideas on teaching main idea, use ReadWorks.org.

  • Display genre posters.  Furnish library with different genres.  Model comparing and contrasting characteristics of text to identify genre.  Begin with simple genres.  Provide practice comparing and contrasting characteristics of genres independently and with partners.

  • Using a picture book, model identifying plot, using story maps to record text details.  Model using a story map to create a summary.  Provide guided practice summarizing texts using story maps.  

  • For more summarizing activities, go to Reading Rockets - Summarizing or Read, Write, Think.

  • After reading a short text or paragraph, ask students to identify the main idea and relevant details then record answers in a graphic organizer.  Remind paraphrasing is “using your own words”.  Model putting the main idea and relevant details in your own words (paraphrasing).  Provide guided practice paraphrasing main ideas and relevant details.
Understanding 
  • Reading grade-appropriate texts, ask students to identify and record the main idea and relevant details.  Using notes or graphic organizer, students explain how relevant details support the text. Provide practice identifying the importance of relevant details to support the text.

  • For additional ideas on teaching relevancy of details, use ReadWorks.org.

  • Display genre posters.  Furnish library with different genres.  Using grade-level texts, students compare and contrast texts to distinguish genres using graphic organizers.  Provide students opportunities to compare and contrast details in various texts to distinguish genres using graphic organizers, independently or with partners.

  • After reading a text, students will identify important events, plot, conflict, and climax, recording information in story map then use to create a summary.  Provide practice summarizing texts using story maps.

  • For other summarizing activities, go to Reading Rockets - Summarizing or Read, Write, Think.

  • After reading a short text or paragraph, ask students to identify the main idea and supporting details and record answers in a graphic organizer.  Remind students paraphrasing is “using your own words”.  Provide examples of paraphrasing main idea and supporting details.  Provide practice paraphrasing main ideas and relevant details with partners or independently.

Deeper

Acquisition 

  • After reading a text, ask students to identify important events then complete a graphic organizer, such as Somebody/ Wanted/But/So, story maps, or concept maps to aid summarizing.  Provide practice creating summaries from graphic organizers.   

  • Work with partners locating the main idea of a paragraph, section of text, or short story, or video, then paraphrase the main idea.

  • Create a presentation comparing and contrasting genres using foldables, posters, or app.

Back to Homepage

Back to 4th Grade Introduction

4th Grade Proficiency Levels

 

Comments (0)

You don't have permission to comment on this page.