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8-3-R-1

Page history last edited by Jason Stephenson 1 year, 11 months ago

Standard 3: Critical Reading and Writing

Students will apply critical thinking skills to reading and writing.

 For more specific genre information, please refer to Genre Guidance (page 4 of the Support Documents.).

 

READING: Students will comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and respond to a variety of complex texts of all literary and informational genres from a variety of historical, cultural, ethnic, and global perspectives.
8.3.R.1 Students will analyze works written on the same topic and compare the methods the authors use to achieve similar or different purposes and include support using textual evidence.

Student Actions 

Teacher Actions 

  • Students will examine various texts containing the same topic.
  • Students will compare and contrast the techniques authors use to write different texts on the same topic.
  • Students will reference evidence from texts.
  • Students will select a reading strategy for Close Reading to analyze the passages written on the same topic. (i.e. Adlit.org:SQ3r  SIFT, etc.)

 

 

 

 

  • Teachers model how to examine various texts containing the same topic.
  • Teachers provide opportunities for students to examine various texts containing the same topic.
  • Teachers monitor student understanding of how to examine various texts containing the same topic.
  • Teachers model how to compare and contrast the techniques authors use to write different texts on the same topic.
  • Teachers provide opportunities for students to compare and contrast the techniques authors use to write different texts on the same topic.
  • Teachers monitor students’ understanding of how to compare and contrast the techniques authors use to write different texts on the same topic.
  • Teachers model how to reference evidence from texts.
  • Teachers provide opportunities for students to reference evidence from texts.
  • Teachers monitor students’ understanding of how to reference evidence from texts.
  • Teacher provide feedback as necessary as students reference evidence from texts.
  • Teachers use multiple texts about the same topic from different authors that will allow the students to compare or contrast the stated or implied purposes.
  • Teachers create coherence within the curriculum as a whole by choosing grade-level literary and/or informational text.  Informational text can help build background knowledge of the topic the students read.
  • Teachers provide a graphic organizer (i.e. Venn Diagram) to help students compare and contrast the author’s stated or implied purposes. 
  • Teachers present lesson on implied and stated author’s purpose.

Supporting Resources

Teacher Insights

 

  • Authors make many rhetorical and style choices regarding the arrangement of the idea(s) or argument(s), the syntax, and the diction. All of these choices are made for different effects including appeals to ethos, pathos, and/or logos.

    • Ethos: the credibility and/or character of the speaker

    • Pathos: the emotional appeals; tugging at the heartstrings

    • Logos: the use of facts, statistics, and logic

  • Purpose is the specific reason(s) for writing a text, and is the objective that the writer wishes to achieve.  

    • There are three primary purposes of a text: to inform, to persuade, and to entertain.  

    • These three purposes may be specified with more active verbs, particularly when comparing works.

  • When analyzing literature, students should identify the concrete elements authors include (diction, details, syntax, etc.) that impact the abstract elements created by the work as a whole (theme, tone, author’s purpose etc.)

    • Example: The dark and oppressive diction in Poe’s “The Fall of the House of Usher” helps establish the ominous mood or tone of the piece.  

  • This standard goes beyond simply identifying rhetorical and style choices an author makes by including an analysis of those choices.  

    • A rhetorical analysis is an evaluation of a text that assesses the rhetorical and stylistic choices the speaker made to determine the strengths and weaknesses of the writer’s message--What are the effects of the choices? How successful was the author’s purpose?  This is also known as a critical analysis. (More info on how to write a rhetorical analysis.)

    • The following sites are good references for lists of the different choices and devices along with providing examples and explanations of why they would be used for each item: literarydevices.com.

  • Students may compare different types of texts on the same topic that may include, but are not limited to, essays, articles, op-eds, blogs, interviews, poems, short stories, novels, and plays.

    • Students may read all of or an excerpt from texts that focus on a similar topic; for example, war and analyze how each author addresses that theme.

      • Textual details must be cited (see Standard 9.6.R.2 for details about citations).

  • Venn Diagrams are not the only graphic organizers used when making comparisons.  On a T-chart, the two items being compared (Items A & B) are still flanking the left and right sides of the organizer. The middle column is for the features, facets, or aspects of both items you want to study and analyze.

Due to recursive nature of the standards, it is essential that teachers are aware of how all objectives within and between strands work together for optimal instruction.

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