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7th Grade Objective Analysis Standard 3: Critical Rdg and Wtg

Page history last edited by Tashe Harris 3 years, 2 months ago

 Oklahoma Academic Standards for

 English Language Arts |Grade Level Objective Analysis

 

Standard 3: Critical Reading and Writing

Students will apply critical thinking skills to reading and writing.

Reading

Students will comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and respond to a variety of complex texts of all literary and informational genres from a variety of historical, cultural, ethnic, and global perspectives.

Writing

Students will write for varied purposes and audiences in all modes, using fully developed ideas, strong organization, well-chosen words, fluent sentences, and appropriate voice.

 For more specific genre information, please refer to Genre Guidance (page 4 of the Support Documents.).

 

READING: Students will comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and respond to a variety of complex texts of all literary and informational genres from a variety of historical, cultural, ethnic, and global perspectives.

Student Actions 

Teacher Actions 

7.3.R.1 Students will compare and contrast stated or implied purposes of authors writing on the same topic in grade-level literary and/or informational texts.

  • Students will find similarities and difference across various genres on the same topic with literary or informational texts.

  • Teachers model comparing and contrasting stated or implied author's purpose.Example: Looking at two texts written on the same topic and identifying similarities and differences in the author’s purposes.
  • Teachers provide a variety of texts from various genres on the same topic.

  • Teachers provide opportunities to compare and contrast stated or implied purposes of authors.

  • Students will find similarities and difference between the author’s purpose (e.g., to inform, entertain, or explain) across multiple texts.

7.3.R.2 Students will evaluate how the point of view and perspective affect grade-level literary and/or informational text.

  • Students will analyze how the author’s point of view affects the reader’s perspective of the literary or informational text.

 

 

  • Teachers model evaluating how an author's point of view and perspective effects the interpretation of the text. Example: Discussing how a text would change if it was written from the point of view of a different character.

  • Teachers provide opportunities for students to evaluate how an author's point of view and perspective effects the interpretation of the text.

  • Teachers monitor students evaluation of author’s point of view and perspective.

7.3.R.3 Students will analyze how key literary elements contribute to the meaning of the literary work:

  • setting

  • plot

  • characters (i.e., protagonist, antagonist)

  • characterization

  • theme

  • conflict (i.e., internal and external)
  • Students will inspect closely how each literary element adds to the meaning of the selection.
  • Teachers model how to examine literary elements and consider their effect on the meaning of the text. Example: Discuss why the author chose a specific setting for a story.

  • Teachers guide students to identify conflicts (internal and external) and how they affect the meaning of the text.

  • Teachers provide opportunities to examine literary elements and consider their effect on the meaning of the text.

  • Teachers monitor student understanding of literary elements and give feedback as necessary. 

  • Students will provide an explanation of how time and place in which events in a short story, novel, drama, or narrative poem contribute to the meaning of the text. (setting)
  • Students will examine how the sequence of events or actions in a short story, novel, drama, or narrative poem contribute to the meaning of the text. (plot)
  • Students will examine how the Protagonist: central character of a short story, novel, or narrative poem or the antagonist: the character who stands directly opposed to the protagonist affect the meaning of the text. (characters)
  • Students will focus on the personality of a character and explain how it adds to the meaning of the text. (characterization)
  • Students will infer the central meaning of a literary work and explain how it contributes to the meaning of the text. (theme)
  • Students will explain how the struggle or clash between opposing characters, forces, or emotions affect the meaning of the text. (conflict)
  • Students will analyze how the internal or external conflict contribute to the meaning of the text.

7.3.R.4 Students will evaluate literary devices to support interpretations of literary texts:

  • simile

  • metaphor

  • personification

  • onomatopoeia

  • hyperbole

  • imagery

  • symbolism

  • tone

  • irony*

*Students will find textual evidence when provided with examples.

  • Students will explain how the literary devices contribute to their understanding of the text.
  • Teachersmodel how to explain how literary devices support interpretations of literary texts. Example: Discuss how the author uses imagery to evoke a certain feeling in the reader.

  • Teachers provide opportunities for students to explain how literary devices support interpretations of literary texts.

  • Teachers monitor student understanding of literary elements and give feedback as necessary. Example: Walking around the room listening to student discussions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Students will explain how a combination of two things that are unlike, usually using the words like or as support the understanding of the text. (simile)

  • Students will judge how a direct comparison of two, unlike things, will support their understanding of the text. (metaphor)
  • Students will explain how human qualities on animals, ideas, or things contribute to their understanding of the text. (personification)
  • Students will explain the use of words that mimic the sounds they describe support their understanding of the text. (onomatopoeia)
  • Students will explain words make an extravagant statement. (hyperbole)
  • Students will explain how words represent objects, actions, and ideas in such a way that it appeals to our physical senses. (imagery)
  • Students will explain the use of symbols to represent ideas or qualities for literary effect. (symbolism)
  • Students will explain the speaker’s attitude toward a subject. (tone)
  • Students will find evidence within the text of statements expressing something other than and especially the opposite of the literal meaning. (irony)
7.3.R.5 Students will distinguish factual claims from opinions.
  • Students will identify factual claims (based on verifiable information).
  • Teachers model how to tell the difference between facts and opinions.

  • Teachers provide multiple opportunities for students to work on separating facts and opinions.

  • Teachers will monitor to make sure factual claims are being distinguished from opinions.  

  • Students will identify an opinion ( a view that is formed about something not based on facts or knowledge).
7.3.R.6 Students will analyze the structures of texts (e.g., compare/contrast, problem/solution, cause/effect, claims/evidence) and content by making inferences about texts and use textual evidence to draw simple logical conclusions.
  • Students will closely inspect the structure and content of the text.
  • Teachers model how to decide what type of text is being examined.
  • Teachers model how to draw logical conclusions based on information in the text.

  • Teachers model how to use textual evidence to support conclusions.

  • Teachers provide multiple opportunities to examine text with different structures.

  • Teachers monitor student understanding of text structure and give feedback as necessary.

 
  • Students will examine similarities and differences about a text. (compare/contrast)
  • Students will examine text structure in which the main ideas are organized into two parts: a problem and a subsequent solution that responds to the problem, or a question and an answer that responds to the question. (problem/solution)
  • Students will examine text structure that notes a relationship in which an event or events (the cause) make(s) another event or action happen (effect). (cause/effect)
  • Students will examine text structure that makes an assertion of the truth of something supported with evidence. (claims/evidence)
  • Students will make inferences about the text.
  • Students will support their understanding with textual evidence.
  • Students will develop a simple logical conclusion.
7.3.R.7 Students will make connections (e.g., thematic links) between and across multiple texts and provide textual evidence to support their inferences.
  • Students will be able to make connections, (for example theme, characters, and setting) between different types of texts.
  • Teachers model taking different types of text and making connections, providing textual evidence supporting their inferences.

  • Teachers provide multiple opportunities to make connections between stories and provide textual evidence to support their inferences.

  • Teachers monitor student understanding of making connections and inferencing and give feedback as necessary.

  • Students will give evidence to support their connections within each text.

 

WRITING: Students will write for varied purposes and audiences in all modes, using fully developed ideas, strong organization, well-chosen words, fluent sentences, and appropriate voice.

Student Actions 

Teacher Actions 

7.3.W.1 NARRATIVE Students will write narratives incorporating characters, plot, setting, point of view, conflict, dialogue, and sensory details to convey experiences and events.

The following statements are elements of a narrative piece of writing.  While composing, teachers and students

need to keep in mind the writing process (7.2.W), word choice (7.4.W), and language (7.5.W). 

  • Students will compose a real or imagined story.

 

  • Teachers share mentor texts to show how authors

    • Establish characters

    • Establish setting (time and place)

    • Use sensory details

    • Use plot (Exposition, Inciting Incident, Rising Action, Climax, Falling Action, Resolution)

    • Create conflict (i.e. internal, external)

    • Use dialogue

  • Teachers model how to write a narrative by thinking aloud through a piece of their own writing.

  • Teachers allow time for students to practice composing narratives while realizing not every piece needs to be taken completely through the writing process.

 

  • Students will establish the characters and setting (time and place) of their story.
  • Students will create a well-structured event and sequence including the five senses that moves the reader through the story or experience.
  • Students will establish a clear conflict and solution/resolution.
  • Students will use dialogue in their writing (when appropriate).
  • Students will use the five senses to engage the reader’s interest

7.3.W.2 INFORMATIVE Students will compose essays and reports about topics, incorporating evidence (e.g., specific facts, examples, details) and maintaining an organized structure and a formal style.

The following statements are elements of an informative piece of writing.  While composing, teachers and students need to keep in mind the writing process (7.2.W), word choice (7.4.W), language (7.5.W), and research (7.6.W).
  • Students will compose informational writing to explain ideas.
  • Teachers share mentor text of strong informative essays and reports about topics that

    • incorporate evidence (e.g., specific facts, examples, details) and maintain an organized structure.

    • use appropriate text structures and text features for clarity.

    • maintain a well-organized structure for the informative writing introduction, body, and conclusion.

    • use a formal style.

  • Teachers model how to

    • introduce a topic and compose a well-developed thesis statement.

    • add relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples to develop the topic.

    • using transitions between ideas and concepts using appropriate words and phrases.

    • write a conclusion to bring all ideas to a close.

  • Teachers allow time for students to practice composing informational pieces while realizing not every piece needs to be taken completely through the writing process. 

  •  Students will select and maintain an appropriate text structure for clarity. 
  • Students will introduce a topic and compose a well-developed thesis statement.
  • Students will add relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples to develop the topic.
  • Students will transition between ideas and concepts using appropriate words and phrases.
  • Students will consistently use a formal style.
  • Students will write a conclusion to bring all ideas to a close. 

7.3.W.3 ARGUMENT- Grade Level Focus Students will introduce a claim and organize reasons and evidence, using credible sources.  

The following statements are elements of an argument piece of writing.  While composing, teachers and

students need to keep in mind the writing process (7.2.W), word choice (7.4.W), and language (7.5.W). 

  • Students will introduce a topic and compose a well-developed thesis statement.
  • Teachers share mentor text of strong argumentative essays that:

    • state one’s position for a claim.

    • include credible facts and examples to back up the claim

  • Teachers model how to:

    • introduce a topic and compose a well-developed thesis statement.

    • maintain an organizational structure in writing, including introductions, claims, and conclusions.

    • sequence evidence and reasoning.

  • Teachers allow time for students to practice composing argumentative pieces while realizing not every piece needs to be taken completely through the writing process.

 

  • Students will make a claim by stating their position on a topic.

 

 

  • Students will introduce a topic and compose a well-developed thesis statement.

 

 

  • Students will add relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples from credible sources to develop the topic following an agreed upon structure.

7.3.W.4 Students will show relationships among the claim, reasons, and evidence.
Students will take a position and show a connection with a stance using reasons and evidence.
  • Teachers share mentor texts to show how authors

    • Take positions on various topics and support them with reasons and evidence.

    • use transitions to move smoothly between the claim, reasons, and evidence.

Students will use transitions to create connections and clarify relationships among a claim, reasons, and evidence.

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Back to 7th Grade Introduction

Back to 7th Grade ELA Standards 

 

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