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10th Grade Objective Analysis Standard 3: Critical Rdg and Wtg

Page history last edited by Tashe Harris 2 years, 11 months ago

 Oklahoma Academic Standards for

 English Language Arts |Grade Level Objective Analysis

 

Standard 3: Critical Reading and Writing

Students will apply critical thinking skills to reading and writing.

Reading

Students will comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and respond to a variety of complex texts of all literary and informational genres from a variety of historical, cultural, ethnic, and global perspectives.

Writing

Students will write for varied purposes and audiences in all modes, using fully developed ideas, strong organization, well-chosen words, fluent sentences, and appropriate voice.

 For more specific genre information, please refer to Genre Guidance (page 4 of the Support Documents).

 

READING: Students will comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and respond to a variety of complex texts of all literary and informational genres from a variety of historical, cultural, ethnic, and global perspectives.

Student Actions 

Teacher Actions 

10.3.R.1 Students will evaluate the extent to which historical, cultural, and/or global perspectives affect author’s stylistic and organizational choices in grade-level literary and informational genres.

  • Students will examine grade appropriate texts of different time periods, cultures, and perspectives.
  • Teachers provide students with opportunities to read a variety of texts.
 
  • Students will determine how historical, cultural, and/or global perspectives affects the author’s style and organization.
  • Teachers provide students with feedback on their responses to the reading selections.

10.3.R.2 Students will evaluate points of view and perspectives in more than one grade-level literary and/or informational text and explain how multiple points of view contribute to the meaning of a work.

  • Students will identify the point of view and perspectives of characters or authors in texts.
  • Teachers remind students how to identify the point of view.
  • Teachers verify students are correctly identifying the point of view or perspective.
  • Students will distinguish between the characters’ (or speakers) and author’s perspectives in multiple literary texts.
  • Teachers explain the difference between the author’s viewpoint and that of a character in a literary work.
  • Teachers provide opportunities for students to distinguish between the characters’ and author’s perspectives.
  • Students will identify author’s perspectives in multiple informational texts.
  • Teachers provide opportunities for students to determine the author’s perspective and how it affects non-fiction texts.
  • Students will make judgments about how the point of view adds to the meaning of a work.
  • Teachers model how the point of view and/or perspective can affect the meaning of the work.
  • Teachers provide opportunities for students to create an understanding of a text based on the point of view or perspective represented.

10.3.R.3 Students will analyze how authors use key literary elements to contribute to meaning and interpret how themes are connected across texts: 

  • character development
  • theme
  • conflict (i.e., internal and external)
  • archetypes
  • Students will continue to identify literary elements.
  • Teachers remind students how to identify different literary elements.
  • Teachers provide opportunities for students to identify literary elements.
  • Students will continue to explain how literary elements contribute to theme and meaning.
  • Teachers remind students how literary elements influence the meaning of a text or across texts.
  • Teachers provide opportunities for students to take the literary elements they have found and find deeper meaning in the text using these elements.
  • Teachers provide opportunities for students to receive feedback about their interpretations of elements influencing theme and meaning.
  • Students will continue to interpret how themes are connected across texts.
  • Teachers provide multiple occasions for students to find thematic connections across texts based on each author’s use of literary elements.
  • Teachers provide opportunities for students to receive feedback about how students connect themes across texts.

10.3.R.4 Students will evaluate literary devices to support interpretations of texts, including comparisons across texts:

  • figurative language
  • imagery
  • tone
  • symbolism
  • irony
  • Students will continue to identify literary devices authors use for various purposes.
  • Teachers choose texts rich in literary devices.
  • Teachers remind students to recognize literary devices.
  • Teachers introduce the term figurative language to encompass literary devices they already know.
  • Teachers provide opportunities for students to identify literary devices and their purposes.
  • Students will continue to analyze how authors use various literary devices in order to work toward an interpretation.
  • Teachers provide multiple occasions for students to determine how effectively literary devices are used.
  • Teachers provide opportunities for students to receive feedback about how students analyze the author’s use of literary devices. 
  • Students will continue to make claims about a text or multiple texts to support their interpretations.
  • Teachers guide students through the process of interpreting a text or multiple texts.
  • Teachers provide opportunities for students to interpret a text or multiple texts.
  • Teachers provide opportunities for students to receive feedback about how the effectiveness or accuracy of the student claims.

10.3.R.5 Students will distinguish among different kinds of evidence (e.g., logical, empirical, anecdotal) used to support conclusions and arguments in texts.

  • Students will understand the argument presented by the author.
  • Teachers provide examples of various arguments.
  • Teachers demonstrate techniques used to understand arguments made by the author.
  • Teachers provide opportunities for students to discover argument made by the author.
  • Students will identify different types of explicit and implicit textual evidence.
  • Teachers provide examples of different types of textual evidence.
  • Teachers provide opportunities to students to identify explicit and implicit evidence.
  • Teachers provide opportunities for the student to receive feedback on whether or not they can identify different types of textual evidence.
  • Students will draw conclusions/make logical judgments about the information within the text on the basis of evidence and prior conclusions/prior experience.
  • Teachers demonstrate how to draw conclusions from text.
  • Teachers demonstrate how to draw conclusions based on evidence/prior experience.
  • Teachers provide opportunities for students to draw conclusions from text and/or prior experience.
  • Teachers provide opportunities for students to receive feedback over conclusions.
  • Students will evaluate whether the reasoning an author uses is logical.
  • Teachers provide examples of logical and illogical reasoning.
  • Teachers provide opportunities for students to decide whether an author uses logical reasoning.
  • Students will evaluate if the evidence used is relevant to the argument or provides enough proof.
  • Teachers demonstrate how to find evidence from the text to support the author’s assertions.
  • Teachers provide opportunities for students to decide whether the author’s claim is adequately supported.
  • Teachers provide opportunities for students to receive feedback about how the effectiveness or accuracy of the student judgments.   

10.3.R.6 Students will comparatively analyze the structures of texts (e.g., compare/contrast, problem/solution, cause/effect, claims/counterclaims/evidence) and content by inferring connections among multiple texts and providing textual evidence to support their inferences.

  • Students will continue to read multiple texts on the same topic written in a variety of text structures.
  • Teachers choose multiple texts about the same topic with different structures.
  • Teachers allow time for students to read these texts.
  • Students will continue to identify the structure used in each text.
  • Teachers provide guidance as students identify the structure of each text.
  • Teachers provide opportunities for students to receive feedback about their identification of structures.
  • Students will continue to make inferences based on the structure and content of multiple works.
  • Teachers demonstrate how to connect the structure of a text to its content and meaning.
  • Teachers provide opportunities for students to find similarities and differences between texts of the same topic and/or theme.
  • Teachers provide opportunities for students to receive feedback about the connections they have established.
  • Students will continue to support claims of the relationships between texts with textual evidence.
  • Teachers remind students to provide evidence from the texts to support their inferences between texts.
  • Teachers provide opportunities for students to support their claims.
  • Teachers provide opportunities for students to receive feedback about how textual evidence supports claims.

10.3.R.7 Students will make connections (e.g., thematic links, literary analysis) between and across multiple texts and provide textual evidence to support their inferences.

  • Students will continue to make text-to-self, text-to-text, and text-to-world connections between and across multiple texts.
  • Teachers choose texts that relate to the students, each other, or the world.
  • Teachers lead discussions of how the texts relate to students, each other, or the world.
  • Teachers create opportunities for students to discover how texts relate to the students’ world.
  • Teachers provide opportunities for students to receive feedback about their connections.
  • Students will continue to support inferences with textual evidence.
  • Teachers remind students they need to provide evidence from the texts to support their inferences between texts.
  • Teachers provide opportunities for students to support their inferences.
  • Teachers provide opportunities for students to receive feedback about how textual evidence supports claims. 

 

WRITING: Students will write for varied purposes and audiences in all modes, using fully developed ideas, strong organization, well-chosen words, fluent sentences, and appropriate voice.

Student Actions 

Teacher Actions 

10.3.W.1 NARRATIVE Students will write narratives embedded in other modes as appropriate.

  • Students will include pieces of narrative writing in other modes.
  • Teachers provide examples of narrative writing that can be included in other modes.
  • Teachers provide guidelines for narrative writing.
  • Teachers provide opportunities for students to receive feedback on their narrative pieces.
  • Students will continue to recognize how these narrative pieces affect their writing.
  • Teachers show how these narratives impact the piece of writing.

10.3.W.2 INFORMATIVE - Grade Level Focus  Students will compose essays and reports to objectively introduce and develop topics, incorporating evidence (e.g., specific facts, examples, details, data) and maintaining an organized structure and a formal style.

  • Students will continue to compose a variety of informative essays and reports.
  • Teachers model or provide models informative essays.
  • Teachers demonstrate prewriting and drafting strategies for informative essays.
  • Teachers provide a variety of informative writing tasks.
  • Teachers provide guidelines for success for each informative writing task, which may include student contributions.
  • Teachers explain the relationship between the conclusion and the rest of the essay.
  • Teachers encourage students to try different rhetorical devices and organizational styles in their informative writing to experience how their meaning can change.
  • Teachers provide opportunities for students to receive feedback on their writing that relates specifically to
    • organization, diction, and syntax;
    • flow and transitions;
    • formal style and objective tone
    • selection of supporting evidence,
    • And fit of the conclusion with the evidence provided

 

 

 

  • Students will continue to follow specific guidelines for each essay or report.
  • Students will continue to introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. (Ideas, Organization)
  • Students will continue to develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic. (Voice, Ideas)
  • Students will continue to use appropriate and varied transitions to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts. (Sentence Fluency)
  • Students will continue to establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.  (Voice, Word Choice)
  • Students will continue to provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic). (Ideas, Organization)

10.3.W.3 Students will elaborate on ideas by using logical reasoning and illustrative examples to connect evidence to claim(s).

  • Students will continue to use logical reasoning or other illustrative examples to support claims
  • Teachers model how to connect textual evidence to claims.
  • Teachers provide examples of logical reasoning (ie facts, statistics) and illustrative examples (anecdotes, pictures, etc.) to jumpstart student thinking.
  • Teachers provide opportunities for students to receive feedback on the effectiveness of their use of evidence.
  • Students will continue to clearly connect evidence to claim(s).
  • Teachers model how to connect evidence to claims.
  • Teachers provide opportunities for students to explain how their evidence supports their claim.
  • Teachers provide opportunities for students to receive feedback on the effectiveness of their use of evidence to support their claims.

10.3.W.4 ARGUMENT - Grade Level Focus Students will introduce precise claims and distinguish them from counterclaims and provide sufficient evidence to develop balanced arguments, using credible sources.

  • Students will introduce precise claim(s). (Ideas)
  • Teachers explain what claims are.
  • Teachers model how to
    • introduce a new claim,
    • find other people’s claims within an argument,
    • tell the difference between valid evidence and fallacies,
    • address bias within an argument,
    • and properly cite sources.
  • Teachers provide opportunities for students to practice each of the skills modeled.
  • Teachers ensure students receive feedback about the student’s ability to build an effective and supported argument.

 

  • Students will distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims. (Ideas)
  • Students will consistently distinguish supporting evidence from repetition or extraneous detail. (Organization)
  • Students will consistently distinguish valid reasoning from a logical fallacy.  (Ideas)
  • Students will understand what comprises sufficient evidence based on the nature of argument or claim.  (Ideas)
  • Students will address audience bias and counter-claims.  (Ideas)

10.3.W.5 Students will use words, phrases, and clauses to connect claims, counterclaims, evidence, and commentary to create a cohesive argument and include a conclusion that follows logically from the information presented and supports the argument.

  • Students will write with the appropriate organizational structure for argument or claim (comparison/contrast, logical order, etc.). (Organization)
  • Teachers introduce the ideas of persuasion and rhetoric.
  • Teachers model
    • different organizational structures,
    • how different structures affect the arguments or claims studied,
    • how to use rhetorical strategies,
    • how to write an effective conclusion, and
    • how to edit for these skills.
  • Students will understand the meanings of persuasive rhetorical strategies. (Word Choice, Sentence Fluency)
  • Students will utilize these persuasive rhetorical strategies in their writing. (Word Choice, Sentence Fluency)
  • Students will use transitions effectively to build an argument or claim. (Organization)
  • Students will use effective strategies for the conclusion, avoiding simple restatement or introduction of new ideas. (Ideas, Organization)

10.3.W.6 Students will blend multiple modes of writing to produce effective argumentative essays.

  • Students will continue to incorporate other types of writing in their arguments to increase the effectiveness of their argument.
  • Teachers will review the different modes of writing.
  • Teachers will model how to incorporate different modes of writing into an argument.
  • Teachers will provide opportunities for students to write arguments that can be enhanced by the use of multiple modes of writing.
  • Teachers provide opportunities for students to receive feedback on their use of other modes within their argument. 

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